Tag Archives: matcha

Hiro Takahashi

Hiro Takahashi
Hey ladies! :heartame:
Thank you for all your attentive and sweet comments on my last entry! It’s really amazing how much you wrote and I appreciate it so much that you actually took the time to write back such encouriging words! I’m sitting on my couch watching New Girl and listening to some alphorn music that seems to come from the restaurant across the street while writing this entry. On my left I have some trusty Neocitran (hot liquid medicine for the relief of symptoms associated with a Cold or Flu) and on my right a pile of Tempo handkerchiefs. Yes, Ive got a cold… My running nose however, didn’t keep me from endulging in sweet temptations. Hiro Takahashi is a Japanese baker located in Adlwiswil, a small city not too far away from Zurich. I think the first time I came across one of his pastries was at our local Japanese grocery store Nishi. But enough said, take a look for yourselves~


Although the Portuguese had introduced bread a long time before, the modernization of Japanese food culture started only after the Meiji Restoration and bread became popular as a breakfast food in the 1960s. Traditional carbohydrate foods have been largely supplanted by bread, which school-lunch programs made popular. These programs served bread made from American flour to schoolchildren. The flour had been received as food aid during the postwar food shortage. Today, about 30 percent of the adult population eats bread for breakfast, but very few people eat bread at lunch or dinner. source

To see the eatable artworks, read on~ :happy:
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Dango

Dango
After four hours of writing a German essay about the most important immaterial goods in life followed by geography and history I was in the mood for something sweet. Today I prepared Dango for the first time. Dango (団子) is kind of a Japanese dumpling that can be sweet or salty. It is made from Mochiko, sweet rice flour that is also known as glutinous rice. Despite its name, this rice has no gluten. There are many different varieties of Dango which are usually named after the various seasonings served on or with it. Today I made Chadango, Goma and Mitarashi. Chadango is with green tea, Goma with sesame and Mitarashi is a glaze made of sugar, Mirin and soy sauce.


The recipe I used is from “cooking with dog” on youtube and has also tofu in it. I like the consistency of Dango and the various toppings make it taste even better. It is so funny and yummy to eat! Traditionally there are toppings like anko, green tea, sesame and chestnut paste but if you’re not that into Japanese flavours you can coat them in chocolate or honey and other things. What I like about this Japanese sweet is that the Dango itself is not too sweet.


To read the whole recipe with pictures read on! read more

タピオカドリンク~ Bubble tea

タピオカドリンク~ Bubble tea
Basically Bubble tea is a cold, milk tea or fruit tea based drink with tapioca pearls. The pearls can be soaked up through a large straw and their starchy and chewy consistency is fun to gnawn on! Tapioca pearls are the prevailing chewy tidbit in bubble tea, but a wide range of other options can be used to add similar texture to the drink. Each of the ingredients of bubble tea can have many variations depending on the tea house. Typically, different types of black tea, green tea, or even coffee can form the basis of this beverage. The most common black tea varieties are Oolong and Earl Grey. The milk in bubble tea is optional, though many tea houses use it.



The oldest known bubble tea consisted of a mixture of hot Taiwanese black tea, small tapioca pearls, condensed milk, and syrup or honey. According to the contested originator from Taichung, the drink was not popular at first, but after being featured on a Japanese TV show, the concept started to be adopted and popularized by drink vendors throughout Asia. source

The first and only time I had bubble tea was in a Japanese crepes shop in Okinawa. I honestly have to admit that I wasn’t too thrilled about this beverage at that time but due to its really easy recipe I will give this chewy fellows one more try. The great thing about bubble tea is that you can try out a large variety of tastes and come up with your very own composition. So here we go, here is what I did following this recipe.
For the bubble tea you need: tapioca pearls (you can find them in any Asian grocery store), black or green tea, sugar, ice and milk or water. Tapioka pearls come in different colors (such as white or brown/black) and sizes. I found the white ones to be more convenient if one wants to add a little food coloring to them.


To look at the recipe read on!

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